Marketing Students, Data & Looker Studio

Recently, I had the opportunity to work with the marketing teacher in school, Mrs. Wilczewski, where we wanted to help students analyze their data collection. In groups, students were asked to research a particular restaurant that could be opened in town. Students organized focus groups to gather some information. Additionally, each group created a Google Form to gather feedback through survey questions. Students were then asked to create a presentation about their findings for a new restaurant in town. 

In talking more with Mrs. Wilczewski, we decided to curate all of the data from each of the 15 different restaurant groups and pull them into a Looker Studio (formerly known as Google Data Studio). To take a look at the Looker Studio, click HERE. A quick sample of what three of the pages look like can be seen below without launching the Looker Studio. NOTE: It is important to note that no PII is included with this Looker Studio. There is absolutely no student information being shared.

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Day 1 of Google 2019 – Google Forms

Screen Shot 2019-12-01 at 6.52.37 AM.pngLet’s face it. Google Forms has great uses in the educational setting. There isn’t a time where students or teachers aren’t completing a Google Form during a particular week, regardless of the purpose. Here are three features that you may not be aware of:

IMPORTING QUESTIONS

You now have the ability to import questions from previously created Google Forms to help save you time. In playing around with this feature, I have discovered that you can also import questions from multiple forms into one form. For instance, you can import one question from a form, we will call form A. You can then indicate that you want to import two questions from another form, we will call form B. This might not necessarily be a feature that you would use on a regular basis, but good to know that it is available to you.

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One Question Inquiry Followed by Immediate Results

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Over the past school year, our administration has asked staff to provide their thoughts about particular topics. In order to collect the data, Mr. Jozokos (our Assistant Principal, now Principal) would send out a Google Form that only had one question in it. Right to the point…asking our thoughts through a multiple choice question.

He designed these Google Forms with a purpose. He wanted to get the appropriate feedback. Kept the forms short, sweet, and to the point; only encouraging more staff to complete it. But the best part was that he always turned on the feature that allowed people who have answered the form to see immediate results at that point. In other words, if I were to answer the one question and then hit the submit button, I had an option to click on a link that says see summary results.

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Lock Mode Hack for Assessment Notes

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I am embarrassed to say that it has been several months since my last blog post. How did time get away from me? Well, there is lots to share but I will start with one idea.

A couple of weeks ago, I had a math teacher, Mr. Stackhouse, email me a statement similar to this one:

“I had my students make an electronic notebook. My thought was that they could print their slides for their ‘notecard’ to use on the assessment. This assessment is not digital. I was wondering if there was a way that we could restrict their Chromebook screens to just their electronic notebook and not have them print out the 10 slide, slide deck.”

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Lock Mode with Google Form Quizzes and Some Discoveries

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Our tech director applied for our entire Google domain to participate in beta version of lock mode with Google Forms. In August, we had shared the announcement with staff that Google was moving into giving staff the ability for students to take an assessment via Google Forms in a locked mode. Teachers were thrilled to hear this. I know there is an argument out there that if students can just ask Google for the answer than, should it be assessed? Sometimes, it does make sense to have students take a formative and/or summative assessment – but as with anything else should not be the only means of how students are assessed.

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